Top 5 Dangers of Marijuana for Teens

Marijuana is an extremely common drug–second only to alcohol in the united states.

In 2018, more than 11.8 million young adults used marijuana in the past year. (source)

Though it is used so widely among teens and other young people, is it safe? The answer is, unequivocally, no. Marijuana contains the mind-altering THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) which can affect the mind in startling ways.

Here are the top 5 dangers of marijuana use in teens:

  1. Marijuana use in the teen years can negatively impact cognition (thinking)
  2. Marijuana can negatively affect memory
  3. Marijuana can impair learning ability
  4. Longterm marijuana use can lead to hallucinations and paranoia
  5. Smoking marijuana can irritate and damage the lungs

Though it may be trendy to believe that marijuana has no ill effects, or at least fewer ill effects compared to alcohol and other drugs, marijana is still dangers for young people and should be absolutely avoided. If you are a parent of a teenager, talk to your teen about the dangers of marijuana. Keep communication open and model good, appropriate behavior surrounding drug use.

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Are you modeling safe alcohol behaviors for your teens?

It can be easy to forget that our teens watch our behavior and learn how to behave as adults. We too often go about our daily lives as parents forgetting that every move we make is being scrutinized by our kids. Today, we want to remind you to take your place as a role model for the next generation seriously. One way you can do this is by modeling appropriate and safe behaviors around alcohol.

  • Do you often have an alcoholic drink and drive soon after?
  • Do you binge drink?
  • Do you allow your teens to drink alcohol in your own home?
  • Do you allow your teen to drink alcohol PERIOD?

All of these behaviors are harmful and send the wrong message for your teen. Instead, show them the following:

  • Drinking in moderation.
  • Always designating a sober driver for yourself if you’re traveling after imbibing.
  • Never allowing your teens to drink, even in the safety of your own home. Alcohol can damage the growing brain and lead to accidents and more.

Our teens learn from our behavior. They look to us for proper cues for healthy living. Be the best example that you can be. Keep lines of communication open between you and your child and be an approachable person for them to share their questions and concerns.

A great resource for talking to your teens about alcohol can be found at the Mayo Clinic website.

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