Archive for March, 2017

Signs and Symptoms of Alcohol Misuse

Posted: March 31, 2017 by cpmacartersville in alcohol awareness
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Most underage drinkers and even adult drinkers often indulge for social reasons. Alcohol can lower your inhibitions and make you feel good, free, and buzzed. But what many adult and most underage drinkers don’t understand is how easy it is to abuse alcohol. Because alcohol lowers your inhibitions, it can be terribly easy to have one too many drinks far too often–especially if you don’t have the accountability that maturity and wise friends can give you. If you’re at a party drinking with other teenagers, chances are, you’re not very concerned about limiting yourself to one drink– as a more moderation-conscientious adult might do.

But what is that second, third, fourth, fifth drink doing to your body? If you’re indulging in alcoholic drinks as a teen or indulging in too many drinks as an adult, you could be heading towards alcohol abuse–the first BAD roadblock on the way to alcoholism. What is alcohol abuse?

“Alcohol abuse is defined as a pattern of drinking that can affect social and emotional responsibilities and even result in legal problems. When a person abuses alcohol, his or her drinking habits can harm his or her health or cause injury to the abuser or others.” From Lakeview Health Systems

PARENTS and FRIENDS: What are some signs of alcohol or drug abuse to look for in your children, friends,  or fellow teens:

>> The odor of alcohol can be found on their breath

>> Frequent changes in mood or attitude that may coincide with avoidance and hiding behaviors

>> Loss of interest in previous activities

>> Developmental difficulties arise

>> They seem depressed and secretive

>> Alcohol disappears from their home

>> An increase in party behavior

Isolated signs may not be an indication of alcohol abuse, but if many of these signs are seen together, try talking with your child or friend about their activities. Be open to what they have to say, but firm about the fact that abusing alcohol to cope with emotions or to fit into a social group can seriously harm their health, result in death, or ruin their emotional well-being. Most teens are aware of the dangers that alcohol can bring, but be sure to remind them of these risks.

What can parents do to help their child avoid alcohol abuse?

>> Be aware of where your teens are hanging out

>> Meet your teen’s friends and only allow them to associate with those whom you feel comfortable with and who are a good influence

>> Set curfews and limits on their independent activity

>> Know the parents of your teen’s friends

>> Encourage your teen to make independent, wise choices for their health and well-being

>> Have your child text you periodically if they are away from home for an extended period of time to check in with you.

Helpful resources on this subject: Dangers to Your Health: Alcohol Abuse // Kids and Alcohol // Stop Underage Drinking

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Latest Graphics!

Posted: March 24, 2017 by cpmacartersville in alcohol awareness
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Feel free to share these graphics with your friends and your family!

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Resources for Teens

Posted: March 17, 2017 by cpmacartersville in alcohol awareness
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It isn’t easy staying avoiding alcohol in your teen years. Here are some resources to help you stay on track!

> National Institute on Drug Abuse for Teens

> Medicine Net

> WebMD

> National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

Study up on these resources and educate yourself about the dangers of underage alcohol misuse!

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Latest Graphics!

Posted: March 10, 2017 by cpmacartersville in alcohol awareness
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Feel free to share these graphics with your friends and family!

3-6-17

3-8-17

3-10-17

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I stumbled across this interesting article yesterday and it raises some really great ideas about what parents can do to help steer their kids away from alcohol: family rules. The rules included in the article were: 1) Make Family Dinner Non-Negotiable. // 2) Educate them and yourself about “scaring the crap out of you”. // 3) Do not condone alcohol or drug abuse directly or indirectly.

I really thought these family rules were worthwhile, especially when the writer discussed them in greater detail individually. I think I’d like to add several family rules to stick to in addition to the great ones above! (If you use these, feel free to add your own!)

4) Know your kid’s friends. // While this may seem self-explanatory to most of you, many parents do not know who their teens are hanging out with on a daily, weekly basis. It is absolutely imperative that you get to know your child’s friend group and if you do not approve of certain individuals for legitimate reasons, take a stand and talk with your child about your reasons for wanting them to disassociate with them.

5) Know your kid’s friends’ parents. // This is another big one that may seem “duh” to some parents and “whuh?” to others. Though your child may have a really classy friend, that friend’s parents might condone alcohol abuse when in their home. You need to know and be comfortable with a child’s parents before allowing your teen to spend time in the home of those parents. Know where your teen is hanging out!

6) Require your child to call/text you periodically throughout an evening away from home. // Depending on how much you feel you can trust your teen, this may be relaxed to a degree, but it is a good idea for you to establish an expectation that teens will communicate with you about their whereabouts and what they are doing when they are spending huge chunks of time away from home.

7) Require your child to participate in at least 1 extracurricular activity. // You don’t want to overload your child with too many extracurricular activities or they might become too stressed, but having 1 or 2 outside-of-school past times can be very healthy, social, and fun for your child. Consider sports, dance, martial arts, music lessons, or another activity that interests them.

I encourage you to read the original article. They make some very good points about the three rules they chose. What sorts of family rules does your household live by in an effort to keep your teens healthy and drug-free? Share with us!

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